Ben Carson Tied With Donald Trump in New Iowa Poll

TIME | Dan Kedmey

CLEVELAND, OH - AUGUST 06: Republican presidential candidates (L-R) Ben Carson, Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker and Donald Trump participate in the first prime-time presidential debate hosted by FOX News and Facebook at the Quicken Loans Arena August 6, 2015 in Cleveland, Ohio. The top-ten GOP candidates were selected to participate in the debate based on their rank in an average of the five most recent national political polls. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
CLEVELAND, OH – AUGUST 06: Republican presidential candidates (L-R) Ben Carson, Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker and Donald Trump participate in the first prime-time presidential debate hosted by FOX News and Facebook at the Quicken Loans Arena August 6, 2015 in Cleveland, Ohio. The top-ten GOP candidates were selected to participate in the debate based on their rank in an average of the five most recent national political polls. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

“These results mark a significant shake-up in the leaderboard”

Retired neurosurgeon Ben Carson tied real estate mogul Donald Trump for the top slot in a poll released Monday, the first time another contender has matched Trump’s lead in the state.

The Monmouth University Poll showed a groundswell of support for outsider candidates with short political resumes.

Carson matched Trump with 23% support among the state’s Republican voters, both of whom were followed by former Hewlett-Packard CEO Carly Fiorina with 10%. None of the remaining candidates, including established political players such as Jeb Bush and Scott Walker, managed to crack the double digits.

“These results mark a significant shake-up in the leaderboard from Monmouth’s Iowa poll taken before the first debate,” Patrick Murray, director of the Monmouth University Polling Institute said in a public statement.

The poll of 405 registered Republicans in Iowa who voted in at least one of the last two state primary elections and said they were likely to attend the caucuses was taken from Aug. 27-30. It has a margin of error of plus or minus 4.9 percentage points.

Source: TIME